Thursday, December 30, 2010

5 Marketing Reminders for 2011: Basic and Simple

Wow, the countdown's just upon us, another year come and gone. But, with the New Year pushing its way in, it's time to go over a few marketing reminders.

Having yearly, monthly, and/or weekly marketing goals are crucial to achieving success. With goals, you know where you’re heading and can work toward that end.

Marketing goals can be considered a marketing plan, and it will have a number of steps or goals that must be set in motion and accomplished.

Whether you’re trying to sell a product or services, five of the bare basic marketing strategies are:

1. Create an online presence and platform

Creating an online presence and platform can be initiated by creating a website or blog. First though, you’ll need to be sure of your niche because the site name and content should reflect your area of expertise is.

Remember, plan first. Choose a site name that will grow with you. Using an children's author as an example, if you choose a site name, Picture Books with [Your Name], you’ve limited yourself. What if your next book is for young adults?

Some authors create sites with the name of their book. This is a good strategy for pure focus on that one book, but again, what happens when more books become available. Will you create a site for each of your books?

While you can do this, you will be stretching yourself thin and diluting your main focus: you as the author of multiple books.

Leave room to grow; it’s always advisable to use your name as the site’s name.

In addition, with today’s gone-in-a-second attention span, it’s a good idea to keep your site simple. Sites that take a few seconds or more to load may cause you to lose potential buyers.

2. Increase visibility

Writing content for your readers/visitors is the way to increase visibility. The word is: Content is King. Provide interesting, informative, and/or entertaining content that will prompt the reader to come back.

Also, be sure your content is pertinent to your site, and keep your site and content focused on your platform.

3 Draw traffic to your site

To draw traffic to your site, promote your posts by using social media. You can also do article marketing which will increase your visibility reach.

Another strategy is to offer your readers free gifts, such as an e-book relevant to your niche. This will help to increase your usefulness to the reader.

This is considered organic marketing; it funnels traffic back to your site with valuable content and free offers.

4 Have effective call-to-actions

Your site must have call-to-action keywords that will motivate readers to visit and click on your links. Keywords to use include:

•    Get your Free gift now for subscribing
•    Subscribe to our Newsletter
•    Free e-book to offer on your own site
•    Buy Now
•    Sign up
•    Don’t hesitate, take advantage of our expert services
•    Be sure to Bookmark this site

You get the idea, motivate the reader to want what you’re offering and give him/her a CLEAR and VISIBLE call-to-action. Make it as simple as possible for the visitor to buy what you’re offering.

5. Develop a relationship with your readers

It’s been noted that only 1% of first time visitors will buy a product. Usually, only after developing a relationship through your newsletter, information, and offers will your potential customer or client click on the BUY NOW button.

While it will take some time and effort to implement and maintain these strategies, it will be worth it in the long run. Think of it as a long-term investment.

Happy marketing in 2011!

P.S. This post was written the end of 2011, but it's still pertinent. The five strategies mentioned are still valid in 2014!

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MORE ON MARKETING

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NEED HELP WITH YOUR ONLINE PLATFORM?

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Wednesday, December 8, 2010

The 7 Deadly Sins of Online Networking by Dana Lynn Smith

I have a valuable guest article from marketing expert Dana Lynn Smith for you social networking authors.


The 7 Deadly Sins of Online Networking
 By Dana Lynn Smith

Online networking is a wonderful way to meet people who share your interests, develop relationships with peers and potential customers, and ultimately increase book sales.

But there's sometimes a fine line between letting your contacts know about your book and being overly promotional. If you're too passive, you may not get much benefit from networking, but if you're too agressive you may turn people off.

Here are seven common mistakes that authors make in online networking, along with tips on how to avoid them:

1. No book information or website links on social network profiles.

I'm amazed at how many authors don't even mention their books on their social profiles, or make it easy for people to find information about the book.

On your Facebook profile, include the name of your book and a link to your book sales page in the little information box located just beneath your photo. You also include a link to your website in the web links section below that, and add more details in the "Bio" section on the "Info" tab of your profile.

On Twitter, be sure to mention your book in the description on your profile page. You only have 160 characters to work with, so if you have several books you could say something like "author of four romantic suspense novels."

On LinkedIn, take full advantage of the "title" field.  This space is designed for job titles, but you can use it to showcase your expertise and status as an author. For example: "Parenting expert and author of "Raising Happy Kids in a Crazy World."  Your title will appear along with your photo any place that you interact on LinkedIn. Be sure to include a link to your book's sales page and your website in the web links section of your profile.

See this article for tips on choosing the best photo to use on your social networks.

2. Not mentioning your book in your status updates.

It's fine to talk about your book in the status updates that you post on social networks, as long as that's not your main focus and you're not too pushy. Be sure to intersperse your book messages with other types of messages (personal notes, tips, links to helpful resources, thoughts on a new book you just read, etc.)

I recommend that no more than 10% to 20% of your status updates be promotional or self-serving. No one wants to read a constant stream of "buy my book" messages. 

One way to talk about your book without seeming too promotional is to discuss your marketing activities. Here are some examples:

•    I just received the preliminary cover designs for my new book – what do you think of these?
•    Today I'm contacting bookstores about setting up signings for my new novel, BOOKTITLE. It's available at www.booktitle.com.
•    I'm so excited! Just received word that my book, BOOKTITLE, has received an award . . .
•    I just scheduled a radio interview on KWTX to discuss tips from my book, BOOKTITLE. www.booktitle.com
•    Today I launched the redesign of my website for BOOKTITLE – what do you think? www.booktitle.com
And you can always mention events and special promotions:
•    If you're in the Seattle area, please join me at 3:00 p.m. on Sunday at . . . for a free presentation based on my book, BOOKTITLE. www.booktitle.com
•    The Kindle version of BOOKTITLE has just been released! You can find it at www.booktitle.com. If you don't have a Kindle, remember you can download the Kindle app and read ebooks right from your computer.
•    Monday Madness Sale! Spread the word -- today only, all of my parenting books are on sale for 30% off. Go to www.booktitle.com to order.

3. Sending blank friend requests on social networks.

About 90% of the network friend requests that I receive have no introduction at all, and most of the others have generic notes like "let's be friends." The trouble is, I don't know who most of these people are.
Don't make this mistake when you send friend invitations. Be sure to introduce yourself—tell the other person who you are and why you want to connect. What interests do you share in common? If you know something specific about the person, say so. On Facebook and many other networks, you can click the "add a personal message" button in the "add as a friend" box, and type in a personalized greeting.

4. Posting promotional messages on other people's profiles or pages.

It's just bad manners to post promotional messages on other people's social network profiles or pages, especially those of your competitors. I delete any such posts from my own pages.

You usually have more leeway in posting messages on group pages. You can get a feel for the group's etiquette by observing that others are doing, but usually it's acceptable to make a wall post introducing yourself and your book, and also to share good news or resources with the group occassionally (see #2 above for ideas).

On my Savvy Book Marketing group on Facebook, I encourage authors to introduce themselves and their books (and post their book covers), but I don't allow repeated blatant promotional messages.

5. Getting too personal.

It's great to tell your online friends something about your interests, but if you're using social networks for business, you probably shouldn't be discussing your health issues, your mother-in-law, or your kid's problems. (Too much information!) It's also a good idea to be cautious about posting things like the dates you are gone on vacation.

If you actively use your Facebook profile to network with family and friends, you might want to reserve your profile for personal use and use your fan page for business. See this article to learn more about fan pages.

6. Sending sales pitches to new people that you meet.

It's nice to do a wall post or send a message to new friends with a greeting (great to meet you, have a wonderful day), a compliment (your website is really terrific) or a note about something that you have in common. You can even invite them to visit your website, if you're subtle about it and include other things in the message. Just be careful that your message doesn't come across as a sales pitch – that's not the way to make a good impression on a new contact.

7. Abusing direct messages.

Many social networks let you send messages to your contacts or members of groups that you belong to. Unfortunately, some people abuse this feature.

On Facebook, the use of direct messages to send promotional pitches has become so prevalent that many people simply tune out their messages. On LinkedIn, someone in a group that I belong to sent me several sales pitches for her products by direct message. I've never heard of this woman and she's not on my list of connections.

If you use direct messages, do so sparingly and be cautious about annoying people – remember that they can "unfriend" you if they get tired of hearing from you. One way to use direct messages is to send a newsletter type of message that contains some helpful tips or resources, along with a link to your book at the end. You can also use direct messages occasionally to announce "news" such as your book launch. 

Remember the golden rule of networking: treat others as you would like to be treated.
Want to learn more about promoting through social networks? Check out The Savvy Book Marketer's Guide to Successful Social Marketing.

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Dana Lynn Smith is a book marketing coach and author of the Savvy Book Marketer Guides. For more tips, visit her book marketing blog and get a copy of the Top Book Marketing Tips ebook when you sign up for her free book marketing newsletter.

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Related Articles:

Your Author Online Platform and Social Networks – Blog Page Views and Twitter Followers
Book Marketing – 3 Reasons Why Editing Should Come Before Self-Publishing

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FOR HELP WITH YOUR ONLINE MARKETING PLATFORM
Visit Platform Building with Content Marketing