Thursday, December 29, 2011

2012 Writing and Marketing eBook Extravaganza

To start the New Year with a BANG, from January 1st through February 28, 2012, all my writing and marketing e-books purchased directly from my site/s (using the Paypal SHOPPING CART) will be $1.19 each. And, this will include new titles added within that time period.

Yup, that’s right, only $1.19 for each of these titles:

How to Write Books for Children: Writing, Publishing, and Marketing Children’s Books;
(nominated in the 2011 Global eBooks Awards – over 100 pages)
http://www.karencioffi.com/how-to-write-books-for-children/

Editing Books Like a Pro: Self-Editing for Books and Articles
http://www.karencioffi.com/editing-books-like-a-pro/
20 Pages of helpful editing tips

How to Create an eBook and Its Many Uses
http://www.karencioffi.com/create-and-sell-your-own-ebooks/
19 pages of step-by-step, in depth instruction and information

Writing, Publishing, and Marketing – You Can Do It!
http://www.karencioffi.com/writing-publishing-and-marketing/
38 pages of information that will help you on your writing and marketing path

How to Start a Freelance Writing Business
http://www.karencioffi.com/how-to-start-a-freelance-writing-business/
33 pages of guidance, including tips for subcontracting work

How to Attract Customers With Informational Marketing
http://www.karencioffi.com/how-to-attract-customers-with-informational-marketing/
29 pages of effective information marketing advice

Learn How to Create and Sell Information Products From Your Own Site
http://www.karencioffi.com/create-and-sell-information-products-from-your-own-site/
17 pages of easy to follow information on creating and selling your own products

New titles to be coming some time in 2012 include:
Webinar Marketing: Create and Present Your Own Webinars
Book Marketing: DIY Virtual Book Tours From Start to Finish
Book Marketing: Soup to Nuts
Marketing Information Products


If you’re reading this you’re probably an author or writer, and I’m sure I don’t have to tell you how important it is to stay on top of your writing and marketing game, the above e-books will help you do just that.

For only a $1.19 each, get all seven titles for under $10.

Click on the links above to review what each book has to offer – each landing page will have a shopping cart on January 1st, for your convenience. Be sure to use the Shopping Cart Paypal Buy Button, otherwise you’ll pay full price.

For a complete ONE page list (with brief descriptions of each ebook) go to:
http://www.karencioffi.com/karen-cioffis-books-and-ebooks/

And, as a pre-bonus, the shopping carts are already up and the special prices in effect, so you can get a head start!

If you want to get your copies right now, here's the shopping cart for your convenience:


eBook Choices





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PLEASE SHARE THIS ARTICLE, and SIGN-UP FOR A Writer’s World FREE MONTHLY NEWSLETTER, A Writer’s World. You’ll get two site-related e-books if you do!

And to be sure you don’t miss any posts here, simply subscribe to this blog (RSS feed).

~~~~~~~~~~~
Until next time,

Karen Cioffi
Author, Ghostwriter, Freelance Writer, Editor

Karen Cioffi Writing and Marketing
http://KarenCioffi.com
http://WritersOnTheMove.com
DKV Writing 4 U

Linkedin: http://www.linkedin.com/in/karencioffiventrice
Twitter: http://twitter.com/KarenCV
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Wednesday, December 28, 2011

Become a Writer: College Writing Degrees for the 21st Century

Today's Guest Wednesday post is by freelance writer Elaine Hirsch, and she discusses they types of college degrees individual can go for to become successful in the writing arena.

Become a Writer: College Writing Degrees for the 21st Century
By Elaine Hirsch

According to the University of California-Berkeley (http://extension.berkeley.edu/catalog/course62.html), some of the factors that help create strong writers includes validating an assessment of potential, identifying strengths and weaknesses, and developing a strong background in writing techniques. If you are considering a career as a writer, you’ll discover that these are all things that you need to focus on. Choosing either a traditional or online school (http://www.onlineschools.org/) university program that can help you is one thing that aids you when you are embarking on a writing career.

One major that you might want to look into is English. For most English majors, the focus is in examining and understanding the work of others, rather than writing your own work. Essentially, in an English program, you are studying through example. Different concentrations in English degree programs will allow you to learn through different forms of the language, so picking one which can bring relevance to writing for an online audience will be key. An English program gives you a sound background in the literature that shaped writing the way that it looks today, and if you have a love of the classics, this is one way to apply your interests to a marketable career in writing.

A major in rhetoric might also suit you if you are invested in writing as a career. Rhetoric is the study of persuasion and also of communication. In many cases, universities and colleges place their creative writing classes here. In a rhetoric major, you will be focused on how to make your ideas clear and understandable to the a wide range of audiences. When you are thinking about audience appeal and how to make sure that you are understood, a rhetoric major might be what you are looking at.

If you want a thorough understanding of the way that narratives work and what stories mean, take a look at media studies. Media Studies is a relatively new discipline, and unlike English or Rhetoric, it encompasses many forms of media, ranging from film to theater to the written word. Take some time to examine the media studies program at your institution to see where the focus might be and to consider what you can gain from studying there. Media Studies teaches students about narrative technique, no matter what the medium is.

For students who want to focus on non-fiction writing, there is Journalism as a major. The journalism major encourages students to write logically and clearly, and it also stresses the importance of good research and a thorough understanding of the subject matter. You may also choose to take classes on technical writing in order to gain a thorough awareness of non-fiction writing.

When you are thinking about learning more about writing, consider what kind of writing you want to do. Are you interested in fiction writing or non-fiction writing, and how do you want to gain the knowledge that you need? Choose a course of study in a college that suits your needs while exposing you to the right influences.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Other Writing Articles You May Find of Interest


Writing a Memoir: 5 Rules
Keep Your Writing Goals Front and Center
10 Great Writing Article Links
Writing Books - Is There Money In It?

To help you with your editing, check out:
Editing Like a Pro
http://www.karencioffi.com/editing-books-like-a-pro/

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
PLEASE SHARE THIS ARTICLE, and SIGN-UP FOR A Writer’s World FREE MONTHLY NEWSLETTER, A Writer’s World. You’ll get two site-related e-books if you do!

And to be sure you don’t miss any posts here, simply subscribe to this blog (RSS feed).

~~~~~~~~~~~
Until next time,

Karen Cioffi
Author, Ghostwriter, Freelance Writer, Editor

Check out my Books Page above

Karen Cioffi Writing and Marketing
http://KarenCioffi.com
http://WritersOnTheMove.com
DKV Writing 4 U

Linkedin: http://www.linkedin.com/in/karencioffiventrice
Twitter: http://twitter.com/KarenCV
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Monday, December 26, 2011

Writing a Fiction Story: Walking Through Walls Backstory


It’s always interesting how writers find ideas when writing a fiction story. Some may simply come up with an idea, others may see something that triggers a story, and sometimes a story is handed to a writer.

I had never thought of rewriting a folktale until being given a rough outline of an ancient Chinese tale, Taoist Master of the Lao Mountain. This was the inception of middle-grade, fantasy adventure Walking Through Walls.

It was June of 2008, and I belonged to a writing critique group along with a Chinese nonfiction writer who had a basic outline of an ancient Chinese tale that he wanted to pass along to a fiction writer. Since writing a fiction story wasn't his cup of tea, he gave me the outline.

After reading the outline, I loved the lessons it could bring to children. Folktales come from all over the world and usually provide morale messages geared toward doing right, rather than wrong. These tales are a wonderful way to teach children through an engaging and entertaining story.

Since the tale, as with many ancient tales, involved an adult as the protagonist the first step needed was to rewrite it for today’s children’s market, meaning it needed a child protagonist. Wanting to stay as close to the original tale, I used some of its flavor, descriptions, and names. That’s how the main character’s name, Wang, was chosen. Along with keeping the story's flavor, I wanted it to be engaging for today’s child, so I came up with new characters, the dragon, enhanced storyline and plot, and so on.

Having an outline to guide me was a great help; it offered a general direction, like an arrow pointing North. So, as I began to rewrite the tale it was able to take on a life of its own, while still heading North. And, to ensure the story kept its flavor, I made sure to include bits of the original story to keep it as close to the tale’s outline as possible.

Working on the story, I knew it needed to take place in ancient China, so decided to use the 16th century as the backdrop for the story. To add an element of realism to the story, I researched ancient China, including foods, flowers, dwellings, and clothing. I also contacted the Chinese writer who gave me the outline for some additional cultural information.

I worked on the story for well over a year, revising it, having it critiqued numerous times, revising it some more, and even had it professionally edited by Lea Schizas before beginning to send it out for submissions. Fortunately for me, the timing coincided with the 2009 Muse Online Writers Conference and I signed up to have a pitch with 4RV Publishing. As nervous as I was, the pitch went well and the manuscript was accepted. For the next year, it was more revisions, tweaking, additional elements to the story, and editing to make the middle-grade, fantasy adventure, Walking Through Walls, better than before.

Then, the story was ready for a cover illustration. Aidana WillowRaven was assigned to my book and although the dragon in the story was described as “a shimmering golden dragon,” Aidana ‘felt’ the flavor of the story pointed to a more oriental type dragon. We went back and forth a bit about the dragon’s size and shape, but Aidana’s vision of what the dragon should look like was perfect.

Now, the description of the 'golden dragon' in the story needed to be corrected. So, I changed the text to read, “Suddenly a magnificent dragon with shimmering red and silver scales appeared.” Done. The description of the dragon and the cover matched; we were ready to move forward.

Next came the interior design formatting, which includes the text. After blocking the text it was determined another six pages was needed to make the spine wide enough. So, I had to come up with more content. As the story was complete, to fill the page count I came up with an Author’s Note page, four pages of Reading Comprehension, an Activities Page, and after more research eight pages of information on the Ming Dynasty time period and the Chinese dragon.

Finally, Walking Through Walls, a middle-grade fantasy adventure, became available for sale in August 2011 and in 2012 won The Children's Literary Classics Silver Award.

Writing a fiction story from its inception to publication can take many paths; this is the path Walking Through Walls took.

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Get your copy of Walking Through Walls through the publisher, 4RV Publishing: CLICK HERE

Or, you can go to AMAZON to get your copy!

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RELATED WRITING ARTICLES

Being a Writer - Learn the Craft of Writing
Fiction Writing for Young Children – 10 Rules
Writing for Children – The Traditional Publishing Path

~~~~~
P.S. To keep up with writing and marketing information, along with Free webinars, join us in The Writing World (top right top sidebar).

Karen Cioffi
Award-Winning Author, Freelancer/Ghostwriter
Author/Writer Online Platform Instructor
Build an Online Platform That Works

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Sunday, December 25, 2011

Seasons Greetings



Wishing everyone a healthy and safe
holiday season and a healthy and prosperous 
New Year.


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Friday, December 23, 2011

Information Marketing: 10 Article Links

This past week I've spend a lot of time reading articles and listening to podcasts that offer great information, so I'm sharing some of them with you.

This is what information marketing is all about.

*****

10 Marketing Article Links:

Marketing Calendar

10 Reasons Your Book Should be an eBook

How to Add Your Website to the ViralNetworkers Directory

10 Ways to Add Facebook Functionality to Your Website

5 Simple Font Changes to Boost Readers, Comments, and Shares on Your Blog

7 Tips to Increase Your Blog Comments

Author Promo Tools: What’s a Sell Sheet?

What is SEO and SEO Marketing?

SEO and Marketing: Basic Tips and Definitions

Rules of SEO for Profit

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
PLEASE SHARE THIS ARTICLE, and SIGN-UP FOR A Writer’s World FREE MONTHLY NEWSLETTER, A Writer’s World. You’ll get two site-related e-books if you do!

And to be sure you don’t miss any posts here, simply subscribe to this blog (RSS feed).

~~~~~~~~~~~
Until next time,

Karen Cioffi
Author, Ghostwriter, Freelance Writer, Editor

Karen’s Books Page:
http://www.karencioffiwritingandmarketing.com/p/karens-books.html

Karen Cioffi Writing and Marketing
http://KarenCioffi.com
http://WritersOnTheMove.com
DKV Writing 4 U

Linkedin: http://www.linkedin.com/in/karencioffiventrice
Twitter: http://twitter.com/KarenCV
Facebook: http://facebook.com/kcioffiventrice
GooglePlus: https://plus.google.com/107054879622971281466/posts

Wednesday, December 21, 2011

Write Books for Children's Based on Your Personal Struggles

Today's guest post is from the publisher of Children’s Book Insider, Laura Backes.

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How to Write  a Children’s Book Based on Your Personal Struggles
by Laura Backes

Suppose you’ve just gone through a divorce and lost custody of your kids. Or a loved one has recently died of cancer. Or you struggled in school as a child because you have dyslexia.

Many writers turn difficult periods in their lives into books for children, hoping to help young readers through similar painful experiences. Here are some tips to keep in mind when creating and selling books based on real-life events:

Remember that you’re writing a children’s book, not a personal essay intended to purge your soul from a painful memory. Children want to read about how they feel. Many writers create a child character and tell the story through that character’s eyes. Don’t write in first person if the “I” is you, the adult author. Instead of explaining how bad you feel that your kids no longer live with you, show how a five-year-old character feels about only getting to see Daddy every other weekend.

Books for younger children (up to age eight) centering around a personal crisis are generally most effective if the author uses a fictional vehicle for imparting the information. If you want to stick closer to nonfiction, make sure the book focuses on the child in the center of the event, and is told in a narrative format with a beginning, middle and end. Older children can handle more traditional self-help books, with each chapter concentrating on a specific aspect of the problem. However, interspersing the advice with personal anecdotes from other children who have gone through the same thing will make the information more appealing and relevant to the readers.

Targeting appropriate publishers with these manuscripts is important. Look in subject index of Children’s Writer’s & Illustrator’s Market under “Self Help” and “Special Needs” for publishers. Peruse the children’s nonfiction section of a large bookstore, and read reviews in Publisher’s Weekly, School Library Journal and Horn Book (trade magazines found online and in most libraries) to see which publishers do similar types of books. Check out websites for editorial guidelines (if you can’t find them, send a self-addressed, stamped envelope to the children’s editorial department asking for guidelines before you write and submit your manuscript). You can also look at books written for parents to help their children cope with an illness, loss or divorce, and query the publisher asking if they’d like to publish a children’s book on the same topic.

Though many mainstream publishers are interested in books that deal with special issues, some topics have too narrow an audience for a large house to market the book successfully. In this case, many authors have elected to self-publish. If you get several personal rejection letters from editors who praise the book but say the audience isn’t broad enough, you might consider publishing it yourself. But self-publishing should be approached cautiously; color illustrations are essential for picture books, making them very expensive to produce. And you must be prepared to devote at least a year of your life to selling and distributing your book. Most self-published books are sold primarily through direct mail. Can you purchase mailing lists of parents with children who could benefit from your book? Stories on adoption, specific childhood illnesses, or those that might fit in a pediatrician’s waiting room or hospital gift shop are examples of books with a very targeted audience.

Laura Backes is the Publisher of Children's Book Insider, the Newsletter for Children's Book Writers. Want to learn how to become a successful children's book author? Come hang with the Fightin' Bookworms at http://cbiclubhouse.com Whether is writing picture books, chapter books, young adult novels, finding children's book publishers -- or anything else -- you'll find all the answers at the CBI Clubhouse!

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Laura_Backes
Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/2848787


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Related Articles:

Determination, Focus, and Perseverance
Writing for Children: 10 Basic Steps
Ingredients for a Picture Perfect Book

~~~~~~~~~~~
PLEASE SHARE THIS ARTICLE, and SIGN-UP FOR A Writer’s World FREE MONTHLY NEWSLETTER, A Writer’s World. You’ll get two site-related e-books if you do!

And to be sure you don’t miss any posts here, simply subscribe to this blog (RSS feed).

~~~~~~~~~~~
Until next time,

Karen Cioffi
Author, Ghostwriter, Freelance Writer, Editor

Karen’s Books Page:
http://www.karencioffiwritingandmarketing.com/p/karens-books.html

Karen Cioffi Writing and Marketing
http://KarenCioffi.com
http://WritersOnTheMove.com
DKV Writing 4 U

Linkedin: http://www.linkedin.com/in/karencioffiventrice
Twitter: http://twitter.com/KarenCV
Facebook: http://facebook.com/kcioffiventrice
GooglePlus: https://plus.google.com/107054879622971281466/posts

Monday, December 19, 2011

Writing Children's Books: Genre Differences

There are a number of genres within the children’s book arena. The target audience ranges from babies right on through to young adults. This provides a unique situation for writers to pick and choose a genre that feels comfortable to write in, while still remaining within the children’s book market.

Each genre is geared toward a specific age group and has its own set of rules and tricks.

Children’s Books: An overview of the different genres and a description of each:

Bedtime stories: These stories are simple and soothing. They are written to help lull little ones off to sleep and are in the form of picture books. The age group can be from newborn to five or six years of age.

An example of a bedtime story is Day’s End Lullaby by Karen Cioffi. The classic Good Night Moon by Margaret Wise Brown is another example of a bedtime story.

Board Books: Board books are simple picture books geared toward babies and toddlers. They are designed to hold up to a toddlers prying and pulling fingers. Board books can be black and white or very colorful. These books usually teach simple concepts, such as numbers from one to ten, days of the week, colors, and simple words.

An example of a classic baby board book is The Very Hungry Caterpillar by Eric Carle. Good Night Moon by Margaret Wise Brown is also a board book, a very well known.

Picture books for the 2 - 5 year old group: These books are meant to be read aloud the child. Rather than simply concept themes, simple story lines can be written with short sentences and words. These books are for children in the ‘pre-reading’ stage and the word count can range from 100 - 500 words.

An example of a very young child’s picture book is The Runaway Bunny by Margaret Wise Brown.

Picture books for the 4 - 8 year old: This genre makes up most of the picture book market. These books are also meant to be read aloud to children, but for the older child it can be read individually. The pictures will give a visual element for children learning to read, helping with the comprehension of the text. The wording and themes can be a bit more interesting, but still rather simple.

For the writer, in this genre you will need to use introduce ‘showing’ to create an engaging reading experience for the child. The average picture book is 32 pages and under 1000 words.

Two examples of picture books for this age group are Walter the Farting Dog by William Kotzwinkle and Owen by Kevin Henkes.

Chapter books for the 6 - 9 or 7 – 10 year old group: Children in this group are learning to read. The vocabulary and storyline is expanding, but clarity is still a must. These books may be labeled as ‘early readers’ or ‘easy readers’ by educational publishers and are designed to read by the child. The word count is usually between 5,000 and 12,000.

An example of a chapter book is Clarice Bean, that's me by Lauren Child; another is Because of Winn-Dixie by Kate DiCamillo.

In regard to Because of Winn-Dixie, the protagonist is ten years old. Since children tend to read-up (the protagonist will be 2 – 3 years older than the reader), the target audience is around 7 – 8 years old, placing it within this genre and possibly the younger end of middle grade.

Middle grade books: The middle grader is between 8 and twelve years old. The middle-grader will go for stories that he can associate with and characters he can form a bond with. The word count is usually a minimum of 20,000.

As the child is able to comprehend more and is maturing, so should the stories. Stories and conflict can be more involved and you can now introduce more than one protagonist or point of view. This age group can also be introduced to science fiction, fantasy, and mysteries.

An example of a middle grade book is Walking Through Walls by Karen Cioffi. The early Harry Potter books by J. K. Rowling are also middle-graders.

Young adult books: This genre encompasses the twelve to sixteen and up age group. YAs can be edgy; plots and characters can be complex and serious issues addressed.

An example of a young adult book is An Audience for Einstein by Mark Wakely. The Twilight series by Stephenie Meyer is also in the YA genre.

A useful way to get a better idea of what the different genres consist of is to visit your local library and talk to the children’s section librarian. She’ll be able to show you books in each genre and give you tidbits of information on which are the most popular, which are classic, and much more.

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RECOMMENDED TOOL

Fiction Writing for Children

If you’re interested in learning to write for children, this ebook is for you. It's a 180 page ebook that's actually a ‘course in a book.‘ It’s taken directly from my 6 week eCourse of the same title and gives you everything offered in the ecourse, such as the basics of writing fiction for children, finding a publisher or agent, and marketing books, except for personal feedback and editing from me on the assignments.


CLICK HERE to find out more!

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Related Articles:

The Elevator and One Sentence Pitch
Writing – Imagery and Your Story
Writing for Children – The Traditional Publishing Path

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P.S. To keep up with writing and marketing information, along with Free webinars, join us in The Writing World (top right top sidebar).

Karen Cioffi
Award-Winning Author, Freelancer/Ghostwriter
Author/Writer Online Platform Instructor
Build an Online Platform That Works

~~~~~

Friday, December 16, 2011

Widen Your Reach - Know Your Audience

Today, I have the pleasure of featuring a guest post by writing/author Holly Jahangiri. So, let's get to it.

Widen Your Reach - Know Your Audience
By Holly Jahangiri

Every writer knows how important it is to “know your audience” when writing the book. Too often, authors forget who their audience really is, when it comes time to market the book.

Virtual book tours are a fun and affordable alternative when travel dollars are tight – but are you reaching the right audience with your virtual events? Do you write guest posts for non-writing blogs in your niche? Do you hold virtual book signings – or had you even imagined such a thing was possible?

A couple of years ago, I attended a virtual book signing event. It occurred at the fan-operated science fiction and fantasy literary and filk convention, FenCon VII, in Dallas. Spider Robinson was the guest of honor, but was unable to attend in person due to the recent death of his wife, Jeanne. Still, not wanting to disappoint his fans, he found creative – and futuristic – ways to participate in the conference. He participated in panels and even did a virtual book signing! The organizers set up a PC, a printer, and a Skype connection with Spider, and attendees could chat for a few minutes with the author and then get their picture printed with him from a screen capture. This was the perfect venue for something like that, blending a sci-fi, high-tech solution with a very human touch.

Do you seek out guest posting opportunities on blogs run by readers who are not writers? For example, Mommy-bloggers and Dad-bloggers are great hosts and reviewers of children’s books. If your children’s book helps to solve a problem, see if you can find a child psychologist who blogs, and offer a guest post – or ask them to review your book. There are also some amazing teen bloggers  (http://www.youngestblogger.com/) out there. When my book A Puppy, Not a Guppy (http://4rvpublishingllc.com/Childrens_Books.html )was launched, I got teens to review it – and one even gave it the “Babysitter’s Stamp of Approval”! I’ll bet mystery writers could find opportunities within the Top 50 Forensic Science Blogs ( http://mastersinforensicscience.com/2010/top-50-forensic-science-blogs/ ) or these 50 Spine-Tingling Murder Mystery Blogs ( http://www.crimesceneinvestigationschools.org/murder-mystery/ ). My point is, don’t limit yourself only to other writers’ blogs. It’s easy, because they understand the need for promotion. Often, they know how a blog book tour works, so you don’t have to spend much time familiarizing them with the concept. But if you are not reaching out to the people who have a passionate interest in the subject of your book, you’re missing out on some great promotional opportunities.

About Holly Jahangiri

Holly Jahangiri (http://eepurl.com/hKnt-/) lives in Texas and claims to channel the spirits of Edgar Allan Poe, O. Henry and Erma Bombeck. She has known since fifth grade that she wanted to be a professional writer. Holly is a technical communicator whose imagination is allowed free rein in her short stories, children's books, and poetry. You can visit her personal blog, "It's All a Matter of Perspective," at http://jahangiri.us/new. She also writes for TheNextGoal.com, and hopes to win it in Weblogbetter's Surviving the Blog Contest.

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Other Book Marketing Articles:

Book Promotion: The Foundation
Book Promotion: Creating an Informational Funnel
Create an Online Media Kit for Books

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
PLEASE SHARE THIS ARTICLE, and SIGN-UP FOR A Writer’s World FREE MONTHLY NEWSLETTER, A Writer’s World. You’ll get two site-related e-books if you do!

And to be sure you don’t miss any posts here, simply subscribe to this blog (RSS feed).

~~~~~~~~~~~
Until next time,

Karen Cioffi
Author, Ghostwriter, Freelance Writer, Editor

Karen’s Books Page:
http://www.karencioffiwritingandmarketing.com/p/karens-books.html

Karen Cioffi Writing and Marketing
http://KarenCioffi.com
http://WritersOnTheMove.com
DKV Writing 4 U

Linkedin: http://www.linkedin.com/in/karencioffiventrice
Twitter: http://twitter.com/KarenCV
Facebook: http://facebook.com/kcioffiventrice
GooglePlus: https://plus.google.com/107054879622971281466/posts

Wednesday, December 14, 2011

Year End Thank You to Subscribers and Followers

Can you believe that it's the end of the year? It's that time when I'd like to take a moment to thank you (those who stop by for a visit, those who follow this blog, and to the subscribers to A Writer's World) for your support. I do appreciate that you take time out of your busy schedules to stop by and visit with us and/or read the newsletter.

Along with a thank you, I'd like to wish everyone and their families a healthy, safe, and happy holiday season and a healthy and prosperous new year.

There are two ways I thought of to show my appreciation and they both have to do with writing and marketing. Well, what'd you think they'd be on? :)

First, we at Writers on the Move put together a  Holiday Season 2011 eBook that offers some writing and marketing information. It's on the sidebar at http://writersonthemove.com, under Gifts. This one is for you and to all who visit.

The second gift will be in the next A Writer's World newsletter, they'll be an exclusive link to one of my new e-books, Editing Books Like a Pro. Please, DO NOT SHARE the link or the e-book. It is meant as a gift to A Writer's World subscribers and is for sale to everyone else.

I want to mention that I'll have the link working for about a week, after that I'm taking it down, so please get your copy while it's available. And, for those who haven't subscribed to A Writer's World free newsletter, SIGN UP NOW!

The newsletter will go out on Friday, December 16th.

I should have the newsletter out by this weekend and in your mail box by Monday. As usual I'm running behind. The story of my life. :)


I hope you are all a part of my writing world in 2012, both here and at Writers on the Move. And, I hope to make lots of more friends and followers.

In addition, Writers on the Move now offers webinars as a new informational tool to bring you more engaging workshops.

My goal for 2012 is to do my best to bring you fresh and useful information, tips, and advice to help you on your writing and marketing journey, from both here and at Writers on the Move.

So, again, have a healthy, safe, and happy Holiday Season and a healthy and prosperous New Year.

And, don't forget to sign up today for A Writer's World.

~~~~~
PLEASE SHARE THIS ARTICLE, and SIGN-UP FOR A Writer’s World FREE MONTHLY NEWSLETTER!

And to be sure you don’t miss any posts here, simply subscribe to this blog (RSS feed).

~~~~~~~~~~~
Until next time,

Karen Cioffi
Author, Ghostwriter, Freelance Writer, Editor

Karen’s Books Page:
http://www.karencioffiwritingandmarketing.com/p/karens-books.html

http://writersonthemove.com
http://KarenCioffi.com
http://DKVWriting4U.com

Want to Write a Book? Three Reasons Why You Won’t

Today, I have a guest post from author, freelance writer, and writing coach Suzanne Lieurance.

3 Reasons Why Most People Who Say They Want to Write a Book Will Never Write One

By Suzanne Lieurance

Almost everyone has dreams of writing a book some day. Yet, for most people this will never become more than a dream. And thousands of others who do manage to START writing their book will give up midway through and never finish writing it. As a published author and a writing coach, I've discovered there are basically 3 reasons most writers give up on their dream of one day writing a book:

1. Wanna be authors think their book has to be one of the best books ever written.

This is a lot of pressure for any writer, much less a first time author. No one could measure up to this, so it's safer and easier to give up before ever starting. But the truth is, published authors simply try to write the very best book they can write. They don't worry about it being one of the best books ever written.

2. Wanna be authors figure they really don't have anything new and different to say that hasn't already been written about before in other books.

That old saying, "there is nothing new under the sun" is true. So published authors don't worry that someone else may have written a book about the same topic they wish to write about. Instead, they try to give their book a unique "spin" on the topic. That means they write about it in a somewhat unique way.

3. Wanna be authors think writing should be easy. If it isn't, that means they weren't meant to be a writer. 

When they start writing, and the writing becomes difficult, they figure they must not be cut out to be an author.
Writing is a craft and it is often just plain hard work even for the best of writers. In fact, good writing is usually good rewriting, so most of the well-known authors work hard at their writing. They write, then rewrite and rewrite until they get the work just right. If they stopped when the writing got difficult, they'd never publish anything either. As you can probably tell by now, each of these 3 reasons for giving up on writing a book is merely an excuse for not following through on a dream.

If you dream of writing a book someday, don't expect to write one of the best books ever written. Don't worry that you have nothing new to say. Just try to say it in a new way. And, most importantly, don't expect the writing to be so easy that there's nothing to it. Just keep plugging along and eventually you'll have a finished manuscript you can be proud of.

For instruction, tips, and advice to help you start and finish writing your book, join the The Working Writer's Club (http://workingwritersclub.com).
Suzanne Lieurance is a fulltime freelance writer, the author of 22 (at last count) published books, and the Working Writer's Coach.
Article Source:
http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Suzanne_Lieurance

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Related Writing Articles:

Keep Your Writing Goals Front and Center
Successful Writing Strategy: Know Your Intent
Write a Novel That Sells

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Until next time,

Karen Cioffi
Author, Ghostwriter, Freelance Writer, Editor

Karen Cioffi Writing and Marketing
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http://WritersOnTheMove.com
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Monday, December 12, 2011

Freelance Writing Work: The Possibilities

As most writers know, there isn’t much money in being an author; the money, if you can get a successful freelance writing business going, is in freelance writing work and ghostwriting.

There are so many different freelance writing and ghostwriting jobs you can do. But, to keep your target market focused and to strengthen your area of expertise, you should choose one or two specific types. Offering too many varying services weakens your platform and your authoritative status.

It should be mentioned that you can also learn the copywriting ropes and create a copywriting business or simply include its techniques to enhance your own writing. But, for now we’ll stick to freelance writing work, including ghostwriting; although some of the opportunities may require a bit of basic copywriting skills.

Freelance Writing Work You Can Choose From:

•    Magazine freelancer - writing and submitting articles to paying magazines
•    Writing for book publishers who accept freelance writers (you’ll need to query for a position)
•    News reporter
•    Feature writer for newspapers or magazines

•    Getting work from job boards
•    Editing and/or proofreading other writers’ work
•    Critiquing other writers’ work

•    Writing speeches
•    Writing content for websites
•    Writing content for newsletters
•    Writing articles and blog posts
•    Writing white papers or reports
•    Writing books, e-books, or pamphlets
•    Resume writing

•    Writing product descriptions or guides
•    Writing presentations
•    Technical writing
•    Educational writing
•    Instructional writing
•    Research writing
•    Legal writing

The list goes on and on.

All written content has the need for a writer. And, chances are there is someone, somewhere looking for some type of freelance writing work. It’s a matter of finding the work and attracting clients.

The important thing is to have your freelance writing business visible. I had someone contact me to write a six to ten page report as part of a job application requirement. He was busy over the weekend and wouldn’t have time to do it himself. He found me through a Google search using ‘ghostwriter’ as a keyword. I don’t do rush jobs, so had to decline.

This is another aspect of freelance writing work that you may want to consider, there are some businesses that offer very quick turn around. People pay more money for this type of service.

Yet another point to make is that when someone contacts you for freelance writing work, and for whatever reason, you can’t do it, try to be helpful in some way; make a lasting impression. I gave the ‘job application guy’ some tips on what to look for in a qualified freelance writer and told him to call me if he needs any other work.

So, you can see that if you’re out there, doing information marketing and building a quality business, it definitely helps in finding clients and garnering freelance writing work.

JUST FOR YOU

Want more information on freelancing? Specifically SEO writing?

Check out Become an SEO Writer in Just 4 Weeks

This 4 week interactive e-course will train you to write super-charged articles and content that will be shareable, engaging, and will increase conversion. Make it a money-making part of your freelance writer’s portfolio.

For information on all that this course offers: CLICK HERE!


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Related Writing Articles:

Article Directories and Ghostwriting
Freelance Writing: An Additional Path to Income
Editing a Book – 10 Tips Checklist for Children’s Writers Part 1

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To keep up with writing and marketing information, along with Free webinars, join us in The Writing World (top right top sidebar).

Karen Cioffi, the Article Writing Doctor 
Prescription for Your Content Marketing Needs
Content Writing Training for Small Businesses, Solopreneurs, and the Freelance Writer

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Wednesday, December 7, 2011

4 Simple Steps to Web Videos That SELL by Ali Brown

Today's guest post is by entrepreneur mentor Ali Brown and it gives you the pieces to the puzzle so you can create your own web video.

4 Simple Steps to Web Videos That SELL
by Ali Brown

Did you know that the #1 activity people are doing online these days is watching videos? Here’s why…

Web video is a great way to stimulate the senses of your audience. Each of us absorbs information differently. Some people learn better by hearing, others by seeing, and still others by reading. So if you aren’t yet thinking about ways to market with video, you’re ignoring a very compelling communication channel.

So why isn’t everyone creating a web video presence? A few reasons I hear from my clients are:

1) You don’t like being in front of a camera.

2) You don’t have the technical competency to shoot, edit and post video footage.

3) You can’t afford to buy the equipment and software you think you need.

Well, the great news is, making a web video does not require expensive gear, tech-geek prowess, or you to magically morph into the perfect TV persona.

I’ve broken down the process into 4 easy steps, so you can get a web video up in no time!

STEP 1: Examine Your Goods

If you own a digital camera, you’re already equipped with all you need to film a web video. Most digital cameras have a video feature, and you might want to check your cell phone as well—a lot of the new models shoot video. But for best results, pick up a solid, small video camera like the Flip Mino, which shoots and then plugs right into your computer for instant upload to your desktop. My team and I use the Kodak Zi8 because you can plug in an external mic for best sound quality.

STEP 2: Shoot to Minimize Errors

To keep your editing process simple, I highly suggest breaking up your shoots into small chunks versus doing one long take. That way you reduce your chance of errors and you won’t have to bother with cutting out parts that are boring, or have any blunders.

Here’s how to segment out your video: Let’s say you have an intro, then point #1, point #2, Point #3, the call to action, then contact information. Write up a loose script that you can follow as you shoot each take, or keep an outline nearby so you can reduce room for errors. In Step 3, you’ll see how beautifully these short takes will work with transition slides to pull together a really polished video.

Wear solid colors that pop, and powder your face if your skin gets shiny. And a big time-saving tip: Try to shoot more than one video at once. Often what takes the most time is all the setup, so you’ll save time in the end. (And ladies, why not only do your hair and makeup once?)

Step 3: Create Slides to Aid Your Message (or Replace You)

PowerPoint slides are a great way to elevate the quality of your videos, and it’s also perfect for those of you who are too shy to get in front of the camera. If this is you, all you need to do is put together a nice-looking PowerPoint presentation and narrate over as you click through your presentation.

Let’s say you do want to be the star. PowerPoint slides are a great way to cleanly transition between your points and reinforce your key messages (like your pitch, your website, etc.).

A basic slide setup would look like:

1. Introduction Slide: include your topic, name, website.

2. Title Sequences: this gives your video a sense of structure, as you present the information (ex. Lesson #1, Question #1, Problem #1, etc.). Keep this to a minimum though, maybe 2 to 3 max.

3. Call-to-Action: tell your viewers what to DO next. (Should they go to a certain web page to learn more? Call your toll-free number? Click on a link elsewhere on the page the video will be posted on?)

Another idea for those of you who are shy is to instead (and sometimes even better) feature your star clients and highlight their successes.

Step 4: Edit Your Video and Post It Online

These days, there are many free, user-friendly options for editing your video. Two popular and simple ones are Microsoft Movie Maker and Apple iMovie. For more fancy editing and effects, take a look at Apple’s Final Cut. Take an hour or two to go through some of the built-in tutorials and you’ll be uploading a stellar sales video in no time!

Post your video online using YouTube or other easy upload sites like Vimeo.com, where you can then fetch the embed code and put the video on your own site easily. And also consider Facebook which has the even better viral effect.

All the Ways You Can Use Video Now

A few ideas are: for your home page as a welcome/intro to your site, explaining a specific service or product, driving traffic from Facebook and YouTube to your website, motivating people to sign up for your teleseminar or webinar, as a replacement for a long-form sales letter, or as a thank you message to your clients. And that’s just a start! Don’t wait… record your first video as soon as possible, and get it up there.
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© 2011 Ali International, LLC
Entrepreneur mentor Ali Brown teaches women around the world how to start and grow a profitable business that make a positive impact. Get her FREE CD “Top 10 Secrets for Entrepreneurial Women” at http;//www.AliBrown.com

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Other Marketing Articles:

How to Drive Traffic to a Website Using Expert Informational Content
Book Promotion: 20 Strategies that will Broaden Your Reach – Part 1
Websites That Work: 7 Key Factors (Part 1)

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Until next time,

Karen Cioffi
Author, Ghostwriter, Freelance Writer, Editor

Karen Books Page:
http://www.karencioffiwritingandmarketing.com/p/karens-books.html

Karen Cioffi Writing and Marketing
http://KarenCioffi.com
http://WritersOnTheMove.com
DKV Writing 4 U

Tuesday, December 6, 2011

Alfindica: The Story of the Ethical Elephants

Today's the launch day for Alfindica, a children's picture book!


Conch Press Publishing are experts in creating captivating books for children, and their new release Afindica: The Story of the Ethical Elephants is no exception!  However, there is a special twist that comes with the launch of this book …

Afindica is a land full of adventure, wisdom and self-discovery where 8 Ethical Elephants live.  Their mission is to save the land by teaching children about different personality types, skills and abilities, so that humans learn to value their uniqueness and how to work together in their own elephant herd.

After reading this beautifully illustrated book, children identify more with their own personality & talents, which increases their confidence.  The Story of the Ethical Elephants is also packed with facts about animals, nature and the world, so children become curious about their environment and want to share these stories with their friends.

As a joint venture partner for this book, I (and others) offer a FREE gift for those who purchase the book - here's the link you'll need to buy the book and get the FREE bonus gifts partners are offering: 
http://promolaunch.afindica.com/promotional-launch/ 

Here's the promo content that went out in my newsletter today:

As a subscriber to our network, we love to inform you of great products and services for parents ... well we have a great offer which is ONLY valid for TODAY 12/06/11!
 

If you are looking for the perfect holiday gift for your child that doesn't cost the earth, then please click on the following link to discover a gift that not only will keep children amused for hours, but will also help increase their confidence and social skills!
 

http://promolaunch.afindica.com/promotional-launch/
 

There is also a SPECIAL REWARD waiting just for YOU when you click on this link ... you will receive over £1000 worth of bonus gifts all relating to parenting, finance, health and personal development ... the holidays have come early!!!!
 

http://promolaunch.afindica.com/promotional-launch/
 

Elephants are helping children all over the world ...
Will your child be one of them?!?
Click on the link above to discover ... 



YOU HAVE TO ACT TODAY TO GET THE BONUSES!



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Related article:


An Effective Book Marketing Strategy: Joint Ventures

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Until next time,

Karen Cioffi
Author, Ghostwriter, Freelance Writer, Editor

Karen Books Page:
http://www.karencioffiwritingandmarketing.com/p/karens-books.html

Karen Cioffi Writing and Marketing
http://KarenCioffi.com
http://WritersOnTheMove.com
DKV Writing 4 U

Linkedin: http://www.linkedin.com/in/karencioffiventrice
Twitter: http://twitter.com/KarenCV
Facebook: http://facebook.com/kcioffiventrice
GooglePlus: https://plus.google.com/107054879622971281466/posts

Monday, December 5, 2011

Writing a Memoir: 5 Rules

Writing a memoir is different things to different people. Some people are looking for closure, or a cathartic release from a traumatic event in their lives, others simply want to share their experiences with readers.

Whatever the reason behind writing a memoir, there are a few rules that should be adhered to.

5 Rules to Writing a Memoir:

1. Know what you want to convey to the reader. Know why you’re writing a memoir and let the reader in on what to expect. This will help give your story direction and focus – it will provide a basis for it to move forward.

2. Decide on what format you will write your memoir, but keep in mind that trying to stick to a purely chronological order can cause a problem with the flow of the story. One possible alternative is to divide the story into specific topics within the overall subject (your life), possibly childhood, education, marriage, family, or other topics important to the story.

The idea is to realize you have options. You might try brainstorming some alternative memoir formats. You can also do some research by reading memoirs by traditional publishers; go to your library and ask the librarian to offer some suggestions. Finding ones that are recently published will be helpful; you need to know what the current market is looking for.

Another aspect of structure that needs to be addressed is how you speak to the reader. In a Writer’s Digest article, “5 Ways to Start Your Memoir on the Right Foot” by Steve Zousmer, it says, “Is the conversation external or internal? That is, is writing your book the equivalent of sitting down in your living room and telling a small group of people the story of your life (external), or are you having an internal conversation with yourself while allowing readers to listen in?"

3. Whether you’re writing a mystery, a romance, or a memoir, you need to hook the reader. Again, read other memoirs for some examples and ideas.

As a former accountant who now writes, if writing my memoir, a possible beginning might be, “From the pencil to the pen.” This possibly has the potential to arouse enough curiosity to hook the reader.

Your experience and story is unique, try to come up with something that reflects that.

4. Don’t let your memoir be a platform to get even with those who you perceive have harmed you in the past. You may feel good about venting, but your readers won’t. This will turn off agents, publishers, and readers. Remember, your memoir should be to entertain, enlighten, help, instruct, uplift, motivate, inform, or encourage your readers; it shouldn’t be all about you and your vendetta.

5. As with any form of writing, the bare bottom basic is to have a proofread and edited manuscript. Even if you intend to have your manuscript professionally edited, you need to know the basics of writing. This aspect of writing entails effort – effort to learn the craft of writing, including revisions, proofing, and editing.

If you are having your manuscript professionally edited, the editor will expect to be given a relatively polished manuscript to work on. Unless of course, you’re having the memoir ghostwritten, in which case you and the ghostwriter will determine what shape, if any, your manuscript needs to be in.

But, assuming you’re doing it on your own, at the very least you need to be part of a critique group, a non-fiction writing group, or one specifically for memoirs. A critique group will help you hone your craft and will spot a number of problems within your manuscript that you will not be able to find on your own. And, be sure the critique group you choose has experienced and published authors, along with new writers.

So many new writers don’t think this aspect of writing a memoir applies to them. Or, they just don’t want to put the time and effort into learning the craft of writing. But, if you intend to submit your manuscript to traditional publishers, or if you are self-publishing, having a polished manuscript is a must. It’s a reflection of you and your writing ability, and will be a factor in how readers view your book.

Writing a Memoir Possibilities

If all the elements and rules of writing a memoir are applied, and your particular story offers unique insights, has a universal theme, has a one or two sentence WOW elevator pitch, is memorable or provocative, it may have the potential to soar.

Memoirs that have gone above and beyond include:

“Eat, Pray, Love” by Elizabeth Gilbert
“Julie and Julia” by Julie Powell
“Marley and Me” by John Grogan

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Other Writing Articles:

Writers and Authors: The Ongoing Process of Evolving
Editing a Book – 10 Tips Checklist for Children’s Writers Part 1
Writing Books - Is There Money In It?

~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Until next time,

Karen Cioffi
Author, Ghostwriter, Freelance Writer, Editor

Karen Books Page:
http://www.karencioffiwritingandmarketing.com/p/karens-books.html


http://KarenCioffi.com
http://WritersOnTheMove.com
DKV Writing 4 U

Linkedin: http://www.linkedin.com/in/karencioffiventrice
Twitter: http://twitter.com/KarenCV
Facebook: http://facebook.com/kcioffiventrice
GooglePlus: https://plus.google.com/107054879622971281466/posts

Friday, December 2, 2011

Annual Holiday Book Drive for Underprivileged Children!


Today's post is short and sweet. 

Award winning author Dallas Woodburn has created and has maintained a yearly holiday book drive for underprivileged children and YOU CAN HELP!

It’s the 10th annual holiday book drive to benefit underprivileged children! through Write On!
 

Last year Write On! For Literacy collected nearly 1,000 books (bringing our grand total to more than 12,000 books!) that were distributed to various schools and charities including the Boys & Girls Club, Casa Pacifica, and Project Understanding. Please do your part to help children have a better holiday season. Help beat illiteracy and give the gift that lasts forever: the gift of reading!

Make a difference and give the gift that keeps giving.

For all the details go to:
http://dallaswoodburn.blogspot.com/2011/11/10th-annual-holiday-book-drive-to.html

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Until next time,

Karen Cioffi

Thursday, December 1, 2011

Writing Workshop: Creating Great Characters

Writers on the Move is offering another great workshop; this one is on Creating Great Characters.

Don't miss out - take advantage of this free writing workshop! 

*****

Title: Creating Great Characters
Presented by: Maggie Ball
Date: December 07, 2011 (Wednesday)
Time: 5:00 - 5:45 PM EST (U.S.)
Format: Live Webinar
Handout: Yes
Cost: Free

Workshop Description:

Think of amazing characters, such as Sherlock Holmes, Scarlett O'Hara (Gone with the Wind), Tarzan, Scout Finch (To Kill a Mockingbird), Peter Pan, Charlotte (Charlotte's Web), T. S. Garp (The World According to Garp), Nick and Nora Charles (The Thin Man), Harry Potter, the list goes on and on.

Characters are at the heart of every great story and every fiction author needs to know how to create good ones. Think temperament, intelligence, appearance, physical characteristics, quirks, moods, mannerisms, and so on. Great characters need to be real, engaging, and motivating; they need to keep the reader reading. They need to touch something in the reader; they need to be remembered.

Join Maggie Ball as she discusses characterization.

To register for “Creating Great Characters” email Maggie Ball at: maggieball@compulsivereader.com

Details to attend the LIVE WEBINAR will be provided upon registration.

There will also be a bonus PDF workshop handout included and registered attendees will receive a recording of the live webinar.

For full details go to:
http://www.writersonthemove.com/p/writers-on-move-workshop.html

PLEASE SHARE THIS WRITING WORKSHOP INFORMATION!

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Karen Cioffi
Author, Ghostwriter, Freelance Writer, Editor

Karen Books Page:
http://www.karencioffiwritingandmarketing.com/p/karens-books.html

Karen Cioffi Writing and Marketing
http://KarenCioffi.com
http://WritersOnTheMove.com
DKV Writing 4 U

Linkedin: http://www.linkedin.com/in/karencioffiventrice
Twitter: http://twitter.com/KarenCV
Facebook: http://facebook.com/kcioffiventrice
GooglePlus: https://plus.google.com/107054879622971281466/posts