Monday

3 Major Don’ts in Your Email Opt-in

Email marketing is getting tougher. People don’t even want to find emails in their inbox. Most people actually open their emails and quickly scan through them to find ones they can delete. The less they have to open the better.

It doesn’t stop there either. People are very reluctant to sign up for more emails going to their inboxes. Emails are just overwhelming and time consuming.

Because of this, you need a strong enticement and strong copy. The reader must perceive the value of the opt-on gift worthy of his email address.

So, let’s go over some absolute Don’ts in regard to your email marketing.

1. Don’t just throw a gift together and think it will lure that visitor to say YES to your opt-in.

It may seem quick and easy to create an undervalue gift, but in the long run, it’s pointless. People today are savvy. They are bombarded with gifts in exchange for their address. Take time and effort to create your gift.

Use analytics to determine what topics your audience is really interested in.

You might also create a survey and see what your audience is looking for, what they need. Then create a solution to that need.

Put on your thinking cap and determine how valuable your gift really is. And, keep in mind that you might offer the gift in multiple formats, since people have different learning styles.

You might offer a PDF, a Podcast, a webinar replay, a lesson from one of your e-courses or workshops, or exclusive to your list only content. Another great gift is an email course addressing and solving your audience’s problem or offer useable tips. Think value.

You need to make your gift ‘look like’ and ‘be perceived’ as a real product, one that the visitor would actually pay for.

Again, think value.

2. Don’t use words like “sign up” or “free” or “subscribe.”

Again, people are savvy. They don’t want to be sold to. According to Marketing Experiments, these terms cause ‘visitor anxiety.’ The visitor subconsciously feels as if there is a cost involved, whether financial, time, or effort. 

Make the sign-up process as soothing as possible. Eliminate resistance.

In regard to the word “free,” it’s a ‘sales damaging’ word. People will equate your list and products/service as lesser value.

Instead of ‘free,’ use words like, “Gift,” Reward, and “Complimentary.”

So, instead of saying, “Get Your Free Gift Now,” use “Get Your Complimentary Gift.”

3. Don’t have opt-in copy that isn’t clear or doesn’t convey the benefit.

Okay, you take care to list what’s in your gift, but you don’t explain how it will help the visitor.

According to copywriter and marketer Colin Martin, “The confused mind votes NO.”

If your copy doesn’t clearly show the benefit, the solution to your visitor’s problem, she won’t click the link.

Lots of people are looking for solutions to money and time problems, so make your gift and copy clearly state how you can help them with their problem.

If you’re in the health industry, you need to create a gift that address the particular health issue your audience is dealing with. And, let the visitor know exactly how your ‘complimentary gift’ will address that issue.

And, make sure the process is easy for the visitor. Remember, “the confused mind votes NO.”

Focus on results and convenience.

Summing It Up
Getting visitors to opt-in to your mailing list is tricky. You’re one of millions trying to get that email address. Check your gift and opt-in copy to make sure you’re not making the mistakes listed above.

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MORE ON INBOUND MARKETING

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Don't Make These Landing Page Mistakes and What to do If You Have
Email Marketing and Call-to-Actions (CTAs)

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